Award-winning performer talks music career

Award-winning performer talks music career

Musician Joey Stuckey performs at a master class on April 24th in the Hub. He also spoke to students about his life experience of surviving a brain tumor.  Michael Kavitz/Printz

Musician Joey Stuckey performs at a master class on April 24th in the Hub. He also spoke to students about his life experience of surviving a brain tumor.
Michael Kavitz/Printz

Well-known performer and producer Joey Stuckey visited The University of Southern Mississippi on Thursday, April 24 and Friday, April 25. To kick off his time at the university, Stuckey was featured as a guest on WUSM’s afternoon radio show, Southern Miss Today. During the interview, Stuckey discussed his childhood, as well as what made him decide to pursue a career in music.

Stuckey said when he was 13 years old, he was listening to the radio and decided to call the station. He said he and the DJ became friends, which resulted in his idea to design sound effects for movies. He continued by informing the listeners that the man later visited his house and began teaching him about the music industry.

“He taught me all I needed to know about sound, and that is when I figured out what the rest of my life was going to be like,” Stuckey said.

He then discussed how that event led to him moving to Georgia when he was 15, where he got his first paying job working with sound. Stuckey informed the listeners that this was the kind of inspiration he was going to continue to discuss in his speech later that day.

“A lot of people are afraid to do what’s in their heart,” Stuckey said, something he believes is a mistake.

According to Stuckey’s website, he, who is visually impaired, is an award-winning guitarist, songwriter, singer, composer, producer, radio and television personality, music teacher and sound engineer.

Following his interview, Stuckey performed at 1 p.m. in the Hub. He later concluded the day by giving a speech to students and performing in the Thad Cochran Center at 4 p.m.

Throughout Stuckey’s speech, he discussed the different types of sports he likes, what it was like growing up as a visually impaired individual, how he graduated high school at age 14 and moved at 15, which eventually led to his work with famous faces and bands such as singer Tricia Yearwood and ‘90s band Smashmouth.

According to a press release, Stuckey also taught a master class in the recording studio located in College Hall on April 25 following his performance at Nick’s Ice House.

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