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Sports Softball Lady Eagles lose rematch to South Alabama, 4-3

Lady Eagles lose rematch to South Alabama, 4-3

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After upsetting South Alabama at home on Mar. 22, Southern Miss could not notch a second win against the Jaguars this season, blowing a 3-0 lead in the fourth inning and losing the weekday matchup, 4-3. 

After two scoreless innings to start the game, Lauren Holifield put the Lady Eagles on the board first in the top of the third inning with a two-run home run to left center field. The team would add to their lead in the top of the fourth inning on a Samantha Reynolds RBI double that brought Rachel Johnson home, giving the team a 3-0 advantage in the contest.

It was in the bottom of the fourth inning that momentum started to shift in South Alabama’s favor. Savanna Mayo got things going for the Jaguars when she scored on an RBI double, followed by an Abby Krzywiecki score off of a Megan Harris RBI groundout later in the inning.

South Alabama would then take the lead with two outs in the fourth inning after a Kristian Foster RBI single allowed both Kaleigh Todd and MC Nichols to score, giving them a 4-3 advantage.

The four-run fourth inning would prove to be all the Jaguars needed to win, as neither team scored for the rest of the contest.

Starting USM pitcher Samantha Robles dropped to 4-7 on the season with the loss. In addition to allowing four runs, she allowed six hits and struck out four batters on the night.

Despite the loss, the Lady Eagles found some success offensively, notching nine total hits compared to six hits for South Alabama. Six Southern Miss batters also notched hits on the night, with Chase Nelson and Tori Dew leading the team with two hits apiece.

With the loss, the Lady Eagles fall back to .500 with a 19-19 record. They return to action on Friday for a weekend series with C-USA opponent North Texas. The three-game series begins on Apr. 8 with a doubleheader.

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