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Marvel’s ‘Inhumans’ proves that you don’t need powers to be super

Marvel’s ‘Inhumans’ proves that you don’t need powers to be super

When the most interesting aspect of your show – that centers around beings with superpowers – is a powerless woman with a laptop, it’s probably not a good sign.

Behind the flat, emotionless, stale script and uninteresting motivations lies possibly the only engaging character that’s been introduced to the series. Louise, the scientist that makes a brief appearance after being fired in episode one, teams up with Medusa to find Blackbolt. Though admittedly, Louise is your standard nerd character that knows how to hack because she’s smart and wears glasses. Her tenacious, sassy attitude was the only bearable factor of this week’s episode. Played by the lovely Ellen Woglom, Louise carried this episode, dragging it from its quickly sinking storyline and overall viscous, dull-arching plot.

Without further ado, the good and bad of “Make Way for…Medusa.” As you can see, not much of this was good.

THE GOOD

Despite being one of the only powerless main characters, Louise, though horribly unoriginal, is the best character BY FAR. Though, the silent Blackbolt is a close second, which says leagues about this cast and script.

The banter between Medusa and Louise is cringey at best, if not just a bit charming.

THE BAD

Medusa’s name doesn’t deserve to be a part of the title.

Maximus might literally be the least threatening villain in MCU history. His guards are more terrifying than him, which isn’t saying much.

The acting, namely Crystal’s actress, is absolutely atrocious at times. I understand that acting is one of the toughest jobs to do well, but this is a Marvel property!

I understand making sexual/social connections between the humans and inhumans is important to the storyline of this season, but only confusion and a feeling of dissatisfaction follows a scene of a human and Karnak kissing after they’ve known each other for a little more than a day.

Finally, the episode was just so darn uninteresting. The lack of anything of substance happening was painful. Several times I found myself asking: When the heck are they going to do anything besides whine about not being on the moon?

The episode starts with Blackbolt escaping from prison in a helicopter, though how anyone was called to pick him up is never established. A scientist onboard says that he can help Blackbolt not kill his loved ones whenever Blackbolt opens his mouth. Meanwhile, Louise and Medusa are following the helicopter until they encounter several police cars and are forced to escape Hawaii P.D., losing sight of Blackbolt. Don’t worry though, everything’s alright because the pair somehow magically go free and take refuge in a motel. While Medusa tries to snap back at Louise’s sarcastic comments about Medusa’s and Blackbolt’s names and royalty statuses on Attilan, the two are able to track down Blackbolt’s location

The scientist that took in Blackbolt actually has direct connections with Maximus who is still trying to maintain his new seat of power on the moon, again this connection is never explained or expanded upon. The scientist tells Max that he can give Max powers by examining Blackbolt’s DNA. Max, clearly jealous of his brother and spiteful at being reverted to being a human, tells the scientist to kill Blackbolt, but the scientist needs Blackbolt alive in order to give Max powers.

Crystal, the princess of Attilan and Medusa’s sister, is now in Hawaii and is crying because Lockjaw, her giant CGI dog, was hit by a “dreamy” guy on a four-wheeler, Dave. Dave conveniently knows a vet nearby who just so happens to be his ex-girlfriend. Cue the uncomfortable, not interesting tension while Crystal stupidly wonders why her dog can’t be instantly cured.

Louise and Medusa interrupt a skirmish between Blackbolt and Max’s guards, and they all escape the lab. Medusa and Blackbolt share an incredibly unrealistic kiss. Karmak, Blackbolt’s cousin who also escaped in episode one but hasn’t been interesting since his introduction, sleeps with a human in her tent in the woods while another jealous human plots Karmak’s death. Gorgon, another of Blackbolt’s cousins and the only other character that’s a bit interesting, is pushed to the side. I literally cannot remember anything significant Gorgon did throughout the episode.

The writers clearly have their work cut out for them if they want “Inhumans” to reach a second season, but I still can’t turn my back on Marvel, so I’ll keep watching until the bitter end.

Make sure to watch Marvel’s ‘Inhumans’ Fridays at 8 p.m. on ABC


 

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