Marvel’s ‘Inhumans’ receives poor reviews

Marvel’s ‘Inhumans’ receives poor reviews

Reviews for Marvel’s Inhumans have not been kind, to put it lightly. Seeing as I’m an avid MCU, Marvel Cinematic Universe, fan, I’d like to give my initial impressions on this unusual, bold step that Marvel seems to be taking. This’ll prove to either be a lot of fun or a long, arduous journey; only time will tell.

Viewers have been waiting in anticipation for this new addition to the variety of shows that Marvel has produced following the success of the 2012 film Avengers. As another addition to the ABC side of the MCU, Inhumans proves to be yet another low-budget, less cinematic production, which is perfectly fine, considering the final outcome is close to stellar.

Marking the MCU’s second appearance on ABC, Inhumans continues Marvel’s successful stride into weekly television. The two-hour premiere demonstrates a promising season ahead for fans of this strange, endearing series.

However, before beginning on the third episode, a recap of the first two is well past due.

“Behold…The Inhumans” sets up the world that this story will take place in, namely Attilan, home of the super powered race inhumans that resides on the moon, and the familiar landscape of Earth. The story is centered around Black Bolt, the self-mute king of Attilan that threatens to shatter the existence of anyone who hears his voice, and the rest of the royal court that he commands. Though a powerful, feared leader, Black Bolt is seen as too passive and lenient towards the humans that drove the inhumans from Earth. His brother Maximus, who is constantly criticized for being a powerless, weak human, decides to lead a coup against the king and his court. In the end, Black Bolt, his wife Medusa and his cousins Karnak and Gorgon narrowly escape to the only safe place- Earth.

“Those Who Would Destroy Us” picks up right where episode one left off. Members of the royal family are now refugees of their own planet and are separated after being transported to Hawaii with the help of Queen Medusa’s sister, Princess Crystal. A scientist receives abnormal signals of unknown objects hurtling toward Earth and she is promptly dismissed because of hysteria. Meanwhile, on Attilan Maximus tries to win over Crystal’s allegiance and sends one of his guards to find and/or kill the royal family. Before the episode ends, viewers are gifted with a very handsome Black Bolt running from police after unknowingly committing theft and assault, and an incredibly cheesy fight between Medusa and the guard from Attilan. In the end, the family is still separated and the guard actually survives the fight by using her powers of self healing.

Now, let’s get into episode three, “Divide and Conquer” with the good and the bad before a brief plot synopsis.

THE GOOD

Producers are obviously setting up a heavily ambitious storyline with the cast diverse characters and their interesting bonds and powers.

The powers themselves, though not ground-breaking, are incredibly fascinating to watch set into action.

The complexity of the story comes to life as the royal family meet the beings they’ve been conditioned to hate humans. Though it could be done with an overall better presentation, this plot point demonstrates promise for shifting the psyches and motives of the inhumans.

Mortin, though incredibly cheesy in his seemingly useless mask, receives a great introduction and demonstrates a game-changing power and possibly the end of Black Bolt.

THE BAD

The unbeatable curse that this show faces is the “low-budgetness” of the production. In terms of Marvel productions, Inhumans is largely…unsatisfying. Though, in terms of a generic show about superpowers, this definitely holds its own.

Incredibly bad acting during scenes that actors have to respond to awful CGI powers.

Literally ANY scenes that take place on the uninteresting, drab obviously low-budget television sets that make up the moon.

The cliché of newspapers lying around simply to explain plot points to characters as if ANYONE purchases newspapers.

The unbearably ugly full CGI giant dog, Lockjaw.

The episode starts with Gorgon preparing to fight the guards that he’s sure Maximus will send for him. Though he tries to get his rescuers to leave the beach and save themselves, they decide to stay and fight. Unknowing to Gorgon, Maximus sends the only inhuman that can kill Black Bolt, Mortin, along with the patrol.

On Attilan, Maximus convinces Crystal to align herself with him in order to truly unite their people, but once it is revealed that Maximus plans to abolish the caste system, which has been in place for centuries, Crystal goes against his wishes and escapes to Earth. In a flashback, it is revealed that Maximus was once an inhuman but he mysteriously reverted to being a human, which explains his hatred for the caste system that forces those with useless/undesirable powers into the mines while inhumans with amazing gifts rule society.

Gorgon and his group of humans finally come face-to- face with Maximus’ guards and an all-out battle rips the forest apart as the inhumans begin to display their array of strange powers. There are casualties on both sides, and Gorgon narrowly escapes death when Mortin lifts his mask and fires off a massive beam of light.

Black Bolt, still imprisoned, meets an Earth-bound inhuman and learns that people with powers are being hunted by the government, never to be seen again. After being told this information, Black Bolt decides he’s done being docile and escapes the prison with the other inhuman after a massive prison brawl between the prison guards and abused prisoners.

The episode wraps up with Medusa reaching the prison just as Black Bolt flies off in a helicopter towards the unknown.

As Inhumans has held a 7 percent on Rotten Tomatoes since its premiere, it’ll be interesting to see if the show ever pulls itself out of the hole it’s dug for itself. Watch new episodes of Marvel’s Inhumans Fridays at 8 p.m.


 

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