• About
  • Careers
Arts & Entertainment The Weeks discuss show in ‘Burg, musical influences, culture

The Weeks discuss show in ‘Burg, musical influences, culture

-

“I think that The Weeks’ music has so many elements to its genre that everyone can find a sound that they relate to. How did you guys get your unique sound from the culture of this area?”

I was lucky to have been able to interview The Weeks before their show at the Dollar Box Show Room in Downtown Hattiesburg.

What I didn’t know going into the interview was that by asking the question above, I would learn much about the musical history of the state I grew up in.

A big part of understanding and appreciating a band’s sound is knowing their inspiration, which is tied closely to the history of the area they originated from. Mississippi’s rich culture of blues, soul, hip-hop, country and rock ‘n’ roll all manifest in a totally unique way in The Weeks’ sound, which is usually described as alternative southern rock.

The guys met through a mutual interest in the musical culture Jackson had to offer when they first became interested in playing music.

“It was unreal the amount of music coming out of Jackson between 2002-2007,” said guitarist Samuel Williams. “There was never any feeling that we were in a small town because we saw music all the time. But you can even go back to the year 1900, and there was stuff going on in Mississippi, a lot of eclectic stuff, that changed the world. Mississippi is way more diverse than anybody knows.”

From being 13-year-olds paying extra cover to go to shows to becoming a major part of a Jackson’s musical personality, they’ve really focused on staying true to their Mississippi roots and local inspirations.

It’s important to the members to convey a sense of personal connection to the music through their live performances, an attitude stemming from they way they were received by the music scene in their hometown.

The band was taken in by the regulars and musicians at the shows they grew up watching, something they hope to do for the kids out there watching and forming their musical futures. They described themselves as “accessible,” which is spot-on.

They value interaction. During the acoustic segment of their performance, the band sat on the floor in front of the stage while everyone in attendance sat around them. They made the performance personal to the audience, which I think makes their perspective on making music and touring so unique.

The band also gave some insight on what to expect from their upcoming new album. Their main goal in writing seems to be finding a light-hearted view on making music they all had when they first started the band as kids.

The guys are focused less on the typical construction of an album and more on experiences that inspire music that’s fun to play. The new album was described as “more aggressive [than previous album ‘Dear Bo’] and smart, but loud and fast-paced rock.”

Overall, they’re locked in on balancing out the maturation that has come from their experiences writing and being on the road with the energy that naturally occurs in their style of music.

The very best part of getting to talk to The Weeks was how down- to-earth they were. They made an interview feel like a casual conversation while also really being able to pinpoint their goals as a band. This is definitely evident in the way they interact with their audience.

These guys are genuine people who take a musical career seriously enough to be successful and refined, but also know how to truly enjoy what they do. Their good energy is contagious and their sound is one of a kind but also a nod to the musical game-changers that came out of the state of Mississippi. The Weeks are well on their way to being one of the greatest names to come out of the South and are absolutely 100 percent deserving of that recognition.


 

- Advertisement -

Latest news

Post Malone uncovers the dark side of Hollywood

For rapper and singer/songwriter Post Malone, vampires are many things: the music industry, ex-girlfriends, social media and more. He brings these monsters to the light in his third full-length album “Hollywood’s Bleeding.”

Students support shopping Secondhand September

According to the BBC, “Secondhand September” is a campaign encouraging people to avoid buying new clothing for all 30 days of September. Many students shop at local thrift stores regularly, and they shared their tips for finding secondhand treasures.

Antonio Brown: How the Superstar’s Ego Is Ruining His Career

In the world of sports, superstar Antonio Brown’s story is an oddity. What many considered to be the best trade of the offseason turned out to be the most disastrous.

Jacky Manteas leads Golden Eagles in final non-conference contest

Southern Miss soccer team (4-3) hosted Jackson State University (0-6) on Sept. 15.

Pet ownership relieves college stress

College can be a stressful experience, and one way that students can ease the tension of college, work and other real-life challenges is by owning a pet. However, having a dog or cat staying in the dorm is not an easy process.

Southern Miss competes in Commodore Classic

Coach Aaron Kindt gives his runners a pep talk before their race. Photo by: Michael Sandoz

Must read

Post Malone uncovers the dark side of Hollywood

For rapper and singer/songwriter Post Malone, vampires are many things: the music industry, ex-girlfriends, social media and more. He brings these monsters to the light in his third full-length album “Hollywood’s Bleeding.”

Students support shopping Secondhand September

According to the BBC, “Secondhand September” is a campaign encouraging people to avoid buying new clothing for all 30 days of September. Many students shop at local thrift stores regularly, and they shared their tips for finding secondhand treasures.

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you