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Features Freshmen reflect on fall semester

Freshmen reflect on fall semester

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Freshmen students tend to struggle to figure out how to answer when their families ask how college is going. They are often staying awake until the next morning in order to finish a paper, eating ramen noodles for most of their meals and debating on whether they should drop that math class they aren’t passing. As they deal with these challenges, they are trying to understand themselves on a deeper level than they did in high school. 

For some people it feels like a blur and they’re simply trying to get by, for others they may be already having the best phase of their life thus far.

Freshman recording industry management Ed Moresco is originally from New Jersey, and he experienced a major culture shock after coming from another state so far away.

 “Southern Miss is great at showing a variety of aspects of life amongst so many people,” Moresco said.

After attending a strict all boys school, Moresco said coming to Southern Miss allowed him to branch out. So far, he has been able to meet other musicians who have the same goals as him and they were able to create a band together.

Freshman political science major Raven Harris said she has had her fair share of trying times at college but has overcome them with her positive outlook. After not doing well in a class she needed for her major, Harris said she realized how important time management is for college students.

“Although this was not the outcome I had expected, I believe it allowed me to confidently make the decision to change my major to one I am passionate about,” Harris said.

Harris also participated in sorority recruitment and joined Chi Omega. She said her involvement has been one of her favorite things about Southern Miss.

“The love and support I have been given from its members have reassured me that I belong at USM and can do amazing things in my future career,” Harris said.

Whether a student has had a great experience this semester or almost dropped out, they have surely learned important lessons that will follow them throughout the rest of their life.

Everyone knows that making friends isn’t always easy. It can be especially difficult in college because of the variety of different types of people. Not everyone has the same mindset because they are coming from different states and even countries sometimes.

Freshman entrepreneurship major, Megan Lindsey, came to Southern Miss from Texas expecting to be able to easily make many friends. She has had opportunities to be friends with people on campus, but in order to stay true to herself and her faith, she does not change for others.

“I have learned that everyone you meet isn’t always going to be your friend and not everyone is always going to like you, but that’s okay because God places people in your life to help you grow and prosper so if they don’t want to be in your life, it’s for a reason.” Lindsey said.

Next semester it is likely that students will use what they have learned this semester at Southern Miss to make their college years one of the best experiences of their lives.

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