• About
  • Careers
  • Newsletter
Opinion Opinion: How National Coming Out Day celebrates pride

Opinion: How National Coming Out Day celebrates pride

-

Oct. 11, 2020, otherwise known as National Coming Out Day, is special for the queer and LGBTQ+ community. People all over the U.S. will be celebrating this holiday and showing off their pride. 

Though we know that love has no barriers, it took a long time for the U.S. to accept LGBTQ+ love. National Coming Out Day commemorates Oct. 11, 1987, where 500,000 people gathered in Washington D.C. to protest for Lesbian and Gay rights. According to National Today, this inspired others to create a national holiday to celebrate coming out. Thirty years later, the holiday remains, and is designed to support those who can and cannot come out as LGBTQ+.

Even though this holiday is a point of pride for the LGBTQ+ community, it also serves as a reminder that they still didn’t have many rights. Gay marriage was only legalized in 2004, and would not be recognized nationally until 2015. 

It is still hard for some people to come out even today. There is still a big stigma surrounding the LGBTQ+ community. Coming out may still mean that families get torn apart, jobs are lost and friendships are ruined. Discrimination still kills many queer people each year. 

This is the importance of National Coming Out Day. Closted LGBTQ+ people need our support to finally stop hiding behind a fake persona and live as they truly are.

Hattiesburg recognizes the importance of National Coming Out Day, too. This year, it will be holding its sixth annual Pride March on Oct. 17, 2020. The march will be hosted by The Spectrum Center and Pine Belt Pride. For those who don’t know, The Spectrum Center is a resource for the LGBTQ+ community to access mental, physical and financial support. This year’s march in particular will focus on justice for transgender women of color. 

“The march will consist of a chant of the thirty transgender and gender non-conforming individuals we lost in the US this year,” explained one Spectrum Center representative. 

Being Black is hard enough. Being queer and transgender on top of that can be horrific.

As a Black queer woman myself, I can say from experience that is a difficult to come out. I go through enough oppression and discrimination from being a Black woman, but being queer just makes my life that much harder. I feel like I must hide that part of me or my mental health will be destroyed. 

Coming from a religious household, I don’t have the luxury to “come out”. I have no sense of self and individuality in my family. National Coming Out Day is an important holiday for me because it helps me realize that I am not alone in this journey. 

Though some people may still not support LGBTQ+ rights or don’t accept transgender people, everyone should support saving a human life. Trans people of color are not safe from the government, their communities, the economy, their families and even themselves. Imagine having to fight the battle between your skin color and your gender identity and sexuality. Just as Black Lives Matter, Trans and Trans People of Color also Matter.

So, I encourage readers to look more into supporting the LGBTQ+ community to honor National Coming Out Day. There are other ways to support than donating money or marching. The Spectrum Center is always open to inform people on how to support the community, and there are a lot of great resources online to explore. 

And, if you want to show your pride in person, just remember that the Hattiesburg Pride March is on Saturday, Oct. 17. Happy National Coming Out Day!

Latest news

Opinion: Amy Coney Barrett clears another hurdle for Justice appointment

Last week, Judge Amy Coney Barrett was questioned on a wide range of topics during a four-day long hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Although she was grilled left and right, it was clear that the hearing was not about questioning her qualifications, but further bickering between Democrats and Republicans.

What’s on the ballot this November?

The 2020 presidential election is now just a few short weeks away. On Nov. 3, voters will have the opportunity to exercise their civic duty, able to give their opinions on topics ranging from the general election to the state flag.

Men’s basketball aims to improve with its youth

After finishing second-to-last during the 2019-2020 Conference USA season with a 9-22 record, Southern Miss looks to improve in its second season with Head Coach Jay Ladner.

Opinion: James narrows G.O.A.T. debate with fourth championship

“Who is the greatest basketball player of all time?” This question typically evokes one of two responses from basketball fans: “Michael Jordan” or “Lebron James”.

COVID-19 turns Homecoming Week virtual

Though there is no official Homecoming week this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Student Government Association (SGA) has planned virtual events to keep the tradition, and its spirit, soaring.

Southern Miss interim head coach tests positive for COVID-19

Days after Southern Miss postponed its scheduled game against UTEP due to an increase of COVID-19 cases...

Must read

Opinion: Amy Coney Barrett clears another hurdle for Justice appointment

Last week, Judge Amy Coney Barrett was questioned on a wide range of topics during a four-day long hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Although she was grilled left and right, it was clear that the hearing was not about questioning her qualifications, but further bickering between Democrats and Republicans.

What’s on the ballot this November?

The 2020 presidential election is now just a few short weeks away. On Nov. 3, voters will have the opportunity to exercise their civic duty, able to give their opinions on topics ranging from the general election to the state flag.

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you